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Message posted on 21/08/2020

FW: Workshop announcement: (How) Does governance matter? Epistemic consequences of attempts to shape research content

Dear all,

A quick reminder that the deadline for the workshop (How) Does governance
matter? epistemic consequences of attempts to shape research content we are
organizing is coming up. We welcome extended abstract (600 words) until
September 15th 2020. Please see below and attached details on the workshop and
do get in touch if you want to discuss your submission.

Best wishes,

Thomas


____


Workshop announcement


(How) Does governance matter? Epistemic consequences of attempts to shape
research content
The workshop takes place on February 11-12 2021 in Berlin. In case the
workshop cannot take place due to travel restrictions, a virtual intermediate
meeting will take place on the same dates and the physical workshop will be
postponed to a later date in 2021.

Jointly organized by
Dr. Siri Borlaug (Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and
Education)
Dr. Thomas Franssen (Leiden University)
Prof. Dr. Jochen Glser (Technical University Berlin)
Dr. Anne K. Krger (Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

Call for participation
The workshop will be limited to 18 participants and focus on in-depth
discussions of papers. While there will be space for short presentations of
each paper, workshop participants are expected to read all draft papers before
the workshop.
We invite scholars from the sociology of science, science and technology
studies and science policy studies to propose papers by submitting an extended
abstract (max. 600 words) to Thomas Franssen
(t.p.franssen@cwts.leidenuniv.nl) and
Anne Krger (anne.krueger@bbaw.de) by September
15th 2020.

Selected abstracts will be announced shortly after September 15th. Full draft
papers are expected to be submitted in December 2020. Publication of selected
papers in an edited volume or special issue will be decided upon in
collaboration with the participants.


(How) Does governance matter? Epistemic consequences of attempts to shape
research content
Drawing on research traditions in the sociology of science, science and
technology studies and science policy studies, this workshop aims to cross
boundaries between these fields to enhance our understanding of the ways in
which different actors attempt to influence research content, processes and
practices. The changes in the authority relations that occurred during the
last decades (Whitley et al. 2010) have led to an increase in the numbers of
actors that have an interest in and the capability to affect the direction of
research: The long-standing attempts of commercial actors to direct science
towards profitable innovations have gained even more traction with the states
increasing support of academy-industry collaborations and of the patenting of
academic research. In addition, the state itself has increasingly tied its
funding of the sciences to expectations of societal impact. Governance
reforms in many OECD countries have increased the dependency of research
organisations on extramural funding, the necessity to demonstrate high
research performance in systematic evaluations and the capabilities of
research organisations to influence their research through hierarchical
steering. Research organisations increasingly rely on bibliometric indicators
and research information systems through which researchers can be monitored,
which increases the influence of commercial companies that provide such
services. Finally, research is becoming increasingly politicized by the state,
political parties and civil society actors who recognise the role of research
as a major power base in modern societies and attempt to increase their
influence on and through research, albeit with varying degrees of success.
While attempts by these actors to steer the directions of research have grown
considerably, their influence on the content of research and research
practices is far from obvious and still little understood.

How do these attempts affect how researchers choose their topics,
theoretical and methodological approaches, and their actual ways of doing
research?
By which means, under what conditions and with which intentions do
actors seek to influence research content and research practices according to
their interests, and when do these attempts have unintended consequences for
its content?
Answering these research questions requires empirical research and theory
development that address the construction and exercise of influence on
research and researchers and researchers reactions towards it. As this
inherently draws on different traditions in the social studies of science, the
aim of the workshop is to bring together researchers from the sociology of
science, science and technology studies and science policy studies. We invite
theoretical, methodological and empirical contributions that address the
question of how, under what conditions and with which intentions different
actors seek to influence research and how these influences affect the content
of research and research practices.

References
Whitley, R., et al., Eds. (2010). Reconfiguring Knowledge Production: Changing
authority relationships in the sciences and their consequences for
intellectual innovation. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pdf which had a name of Description of the workshop.pdf]

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