S&TS journal

Science & Technology Studies


EASST has launched its own international, peer reviewed, online journal Science & Technology Studies.

In response to the steady growth of our field EASST wishes to create a new strong international journal, which is also delivered as a membership benefit to members. The journal is a development of Science Studies, which has a 25 volume history of internationally peer-reviewed publications. The journal is under review to be included in social science citation index (SSCI) and has increased its number of issues to three in 2013 and will target four issues per year in the near future.

EASST members (and other subscribers) will have exclusive access to each new issue for a 4 month period.  Members will receive an email with access details. All older content is open access – a principle of scientific publishing EASST wishes to endorse.

Previous issues can be found on the journal’s own website at www.sciencetechnologystudies.org


Latest Issue: Science & Technology Studies: Volume 27 (2) 2014

  • Guest Editorial
    Antti Silvast, Hannu Hänninen and Sampsa Hyysalo
    Energy in Society. Energy Systems and Infrastructures in Society: Concluding Issue 3 of 3
  • Arthur Jobert and Claire Le Renard
    Framing Prototypes: The Fast Breeder Reactor in France (1950s–1990s) (see abstract)
  • Vincent F Ialenti
    Adjudicating Deep Time: Revisiting the United States’ High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Project at Yucca Mountain (see abstract)
  • Ana Delicado, Luís Junqueira, Susana Fonseca, Mónica Truninger, Luís Silva, Ana Horta and Elisabete Figueiredo
    Not in Anyone’s Backyard? Civil Society Attitudes towards Wind Power at the National and Local Levels in Portugal (see abstract)
  • Jenny Palm and Sarah J Darby
    The Meanings of Practices for Energy Consumption – a Comparison of Homes and Workplaces (see abstract)
  • Antti Silvast and Mikko J Virtanen
    Keeping Systems at Work: Electricity Infrastructure from Control Rooms to Household Practices (see abstract)

 


Abstracts


Framing Prototypes: The Fast Breeder Reactor in France (1950s–1990s)
Arthur Jobert and Claire Le Renard
This paper considers a crucial moment in the innovation process: the shift from a research phase to an industrial phase. The empirical study examines the development in France of Fast Breeder Reactor technology (FBR), from the 1950s to the early closure of the Superphénix plant in 1997. A turning point occurred in the late 1960s, when several European countries judged that the FBR technology was a promising electricity generation technology that would soon be mature for commercialisation, in a context of technological nationalism and future energy scarcity. In this paper, we analyse how the framing of the resulting prototype as “industrial” entailed an impact on decisions during the three decades that the project lasted. Aiming at describing the project actors in action without judging their decision-making processes, we use the ‘framing’ concept preferably to other approaches such as ‘path dependency’. This concept choice is the subject of the discussion.
Keywords: nuclear technology, framing, prototypes
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Adjudicating Deep Time: Revisiting the United States’ High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Project at Yucca Mountain
Vincent F Ialenti
This paper draws upon perspectives on legal personhood, expert knowledge practices, and social relations influential in STS and anthropology to revisit the legal procedural framing of the United States’ now-defunct high-level nuclear waste repository project at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, it examines how this project reinvented both (a) conventional figures of legal personhood as what is called a ‘reasonably maximally exposed individual’ and (b) legal adjudication’s familiar ‘rule-facts-judge’ template as a frame for establishing the repository licensing regime’s delegation of roles, responsibilities, and duties in response to its unique regulatory horizons that extended millennia into the future. Unpacking the implications of these familiar legal figures being brought to bear on historically unprecedented ‘deep’ timescales, this paper concludes by offering alternative lines of inquiry for interdisciplinary analysis of nuclear energy and its associated waste products.
Keywords: nuclear waste, temporality, legal anthropology
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Not in Anyone’s Backyard? Civil Society Attitudes towards Wind Power at the National and Local Levels in Portugal
Ana Delicado, Luís Junqueira, Susana Fonseca, Mónica Truninger, Luís Silva, Ana Horta and Elisabete Figueiredo
This article attempts to explain the swift development of renewable energy, in particular wind energy, in Portugal, by assessing the socio-political, community and market acceptance of renewables. We examine, on the one hand, the institutional and policy framework, the approaches to planning, and the ownership of facilities, and, on the other hand, the attitudes of Environmental Non-Governmental Organisations and citizens towards renewable energy in general and local windfarms in particular. Results show that a highly attractive feed-in tariff system and a system of planning decisions at the national level has led to an expansion of wind power, regardless of a less than enthusiastic public opinion and a sceptical environmental movement.
Keywords: renewable energy, public opinion, environmental non-governmental organisations
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The Meanings of Practices for Energy Consumption – a Comparison of Homes and Workplaces
Jenny Palm and Sarah J Darby
We examine how building and appliance technologies relate to their use by occupants through practices at home and at work. The aim is to analyse how practices are influenced by buildings and other technologies and by social requirements and to add to ongoing research on how to contribute to a transition to more sustainable everyday practices. Interview, quantitative and observational material are used to compare experiences of occupying and using two different types of buildings, passive housing and large modern research laboratories. We apply the practice theory approach. The passive house case showed that the main project of a liveable, low-impact new building was on a fairly manageable scale, with a viable design and occupants who were prepared to adapt to it. The research lab study showed, however, that the configuration of unsustainable technologies and practices can occur at the design stage, and that most actors had very limited room for manoeuvre.
Keywords: practice theory, low-energy building, tenants
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Keeping Systems at Work: Electricity Infrastructure from Control Rooms to Household Practices
Antti Silvast and Mikko J Virtanen
This article discusses the reliability of electricity supply and the management of its uncertainties from a systems theoretical point of view. We begin by outlining recent Science and Technology Studies (STS) literature about energy systems, infrastructures and practices concerning their use and argue that many current discussions hold promise in two directions: one concerns the brittleness and uncertainty of the electricity system that is seen as an ongoing achievement, the other is about broader structuring factors and contexts that should also be acknowledged when researching such systems. With an aim of developing this two-part focus, the paper advances systems theoretical considerations about the electricity infrastructure and proposes an analysis tool to study the necessary reductions of complexity of the infrastructure in two emblematic settings. The sites are infrastructure control rooms on the one hand and households on the other hand. The article concludes by discussing the different reductions of complexity by electricity users and electricity experts through using the theoretical point of view presented in the article.
Keywords: actor-network-theory, ethnography, systems theory
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Previous Issues: Science & Technology Studies:

Volume 27 (1) 2014

  • Guest Editorial
    Antti Silvast, Hannu Hänninen and Sampsa Hyysalo: Energy in Society: Energy Systems and Infrastructures in Society: Part 2 of 3
  • Mark Winskel and Jonathan Radcliffe: The Rise of Accelerated Energy Innovation and its Implications for Sustainable Innovation Studies: A UK Perspective
  • Gerhard Fuchs: The Governance of Innovations in the Energy Sector: Between Adaptation and Exploration 
  • Heli Nissilä, Tea Lempiälä and Raimo Lovio: Constructing Expectations for Solar Technology over Multiple Field-configuring Events: A Narrative Perspective
  • Mikko Jalas, Helka Kuusi and Eva Heiskanen: Self-building Courses of Solar Heat Collectors as Sources of Consumer Empowerment and Local Embedding of Sustainable Energy Technology 
  • Yael Parag: From Energy Security to the Security of Energy Services: Shortcomings of Traditional Supply-Oriented Approaches and the Contribution of a Socio Technical and User-Oriented Perspectives 

Volume 26 (3) 2013

  • Guest Editorial
    Antti Silvast, Hannu Hänninen and Sampsa Hyysalo: Energy in Society: Energy Systems and Infrastructures in Society
  • Les Levidow, Theo Papaioannou and Alexander Borda-Rodriguez: Innovation Priorities for UK Bioenergy: Technological Expectations within Path Dependence
  • Armi Temmes, Rami-Samuli Räsänen, Jenny Rinkinen and Raimo Lovio: The Emergence of Niche Protection through Policies: The Case of Electric Vehicles Field in Finland
  • Mads Dahl Gjefsen: Carbon Cultures: Technology Planning for Energy and Climate in the US and EU
  • Lea Schick and Brit Ross Winthereik: Innovating Relations – or Why Smart Grid is not too Complex for the Public 
  • James Mittra: Repairing the ‘Broken Middle’ of the Health Innovation Pathway: Exploring Diverse Practitioner Perspectives on the Emergence and Role of ‘Translational Medicine’

Volume 26 (2) 2013

  • Editorial
  • Pernille Bjørn and Randi Markussen: Cyborg Heart: The Affective Apparatus of Bodily Production of ICD Patients
  • Attila Bruni and Carlo Rizzi: Looking for Data in Diabetes Healthcare: Patient 2.0 and the Re-engineering of Clinical Encounters
  • Henriette Langstrup, Louise Bagger Iversen, Signe Vind and Thomas Lunn Erstad: The Virtual Clinical Encounter: Emplacing Patient 2.0 in Emerging Care Infrastructures
  • Annegrete Juul Nielsen and Casper Bruun Jensen: Travelling Frictions: Global Disease Self-Management, Local Comparisons and Emergent Patients
  • Jeannette Pols: The Patient 2.Many: About Diseases that Remain and the Different Forms of Knowledge to Live with them

Volume 26 (1) 2013

  • Editorial
  • Anders Blok: Urban Green Assemblages: An ANT View on Sustainable City Building Projects
  • Sampsa Hyysalo, Jouni K. Juntunen and Stephanie Freeman: Internet Forums and the Rise of the Inventive Energy User
  • Torun Granstrom Ekeland and Britt Kramvig: Negotiating Terrains: Stories from the Making of “Siida”
  • Kai Eriksson: Innovation and the Vocabulary of Governance
  • Adrijana Šuljok and Marija Brajdić Vuković: How the Croatian Daily Press Presents Science News

Volume 25 (2) 2012

  • Editorial
  • Céline Granjou and Isabelle Mauz: Expert Activities as Part of Research Work: The Example of Biodiversity Studies
  • Séverine Louvel: The ‘Industrialization’ of Doctoral Training? A Study of the Experiences of Doctoral Students and Supervisors in the French Life Sciences
  • Ericka Johnson and Cecilia Åsberg: Enrolling Men, their Doctors, and Partners: Individual and Collective Responses to Erectile Dysfunction
  • Sarah Parry, Wendy Faulkner, Sarah Cunningham-Burley and Nicola J. Marks: Heterogeneous Agendas around Public Engagement in Stem Cell Research: The Case for Maintaining Plasticity

 


These issues are now available on an open access basis from the journal’s own website at www.sciencetechnologystudies.org

 

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